VCA Animal Hospitals

Pets with Disabilities: Overview

dreamstime_m_22159248Pets with Disabilities: Overview

Our culture is experiencing an ongoing evolution of the human-animal bond: the family-pet relationship. We live in increasingly intimate contact with the animals who share our lives, and veterinary care has progressed to a level that supports longer life expectancy in pets than ever before. Pets are now living longer and better because we are able to feed them better and protect them from infectious diseases and parasites. This means we are witnessing a surge in the segment of the pet population that is senior and geriatric. In fact, it is not so rare to see cats 20 years of age and older and small- to medium-breed dogs in their late teens.

With advanced age come changes to the body and mind that can alter day-to-day reality and activities. It is easy to lose track of the effects of aging and think, “That won’t happen to my pet.” 

The fact is, however, that if we do a good job and lay a solid foundation with our pets while they are young, protecting them through regular preventive veterinary care, they will probably live long enough to develop a progressive degenerative condition that can lead to a disability and dramatically alter their activities of daily living (ADLs).

"Pets today may live long enough to develop a progressive degenerative condition that can lead to a disability and dramatically alter their activities of daily living (ADLs)." 

In addition to the potential to develop a disability with age, some pets are born with their disabilities and live their entire lives in an altered state. Some pets with disabilities (for example, those with a missing limb) are obviously different from their cat and dog friends. Others have “hidden” disabilities (such as deafness). Our improved state of veterinary care increases the probability these pets can live a normal (or nearly normal) life expectancy.

How can I help make my pet with a disability comfortable?

No matter the origin of the pet’s disability, these family members need and deserve for us to plan ahead to provide for their unique needs.

Not that long ago, if a pet faced an illness, injury, or birth defect that seriously altered her body, causing a change in activities of daily living, euthanasia was a common outcome. Of course, everyone’s concerns were for the animal’s quality of life, and it was easy to presume that a loss of the normal routine might result in an unacceptable quality of life.

As veterinary medicine has advanced, so has our understanding of how to keep pets comfortable and engaged in the face of previously devastating conditions.

"Relieving pain is the number one priority for any pet facing a disability."
  • Relieving pain is the number one priority for any pet facing a disability. Many excellent pain management strategies are available, depending on the cause for discomfort: medication, nutrition, massage, acupuncture, chiropractic, physical rehabilitation—the list is long. With so many options, we can provide comfort care for a wide variety of pain-generating issues, whether or not they are directly related to a specific disability.

  • Once a pain relief plan is in place, we can focus on any elimination issues (urinary or fecal incontinence) that may be present. For instance, in the case of paralysis, the pet will need assistance to urinate. Whatever the elimination issue, the veterinary healthcare team will provide whatever guidance and instruction are needed. 

  • dreamstime_s_5660075After resolving pain and elimination issues, we can next focus on mobility. Mobility compromise can occur on quite a spectrum, from weakness to a chronic joint injury to paralysis to limb amputation. Adapting the pet’s lifestyle to accommodate compromised mobility is often limited only by the imagination. Packs and modified infant slings can be used to carry cats and small dogs. Larger dogs are often willing to be transported in a wagon pulled by their humans. Pets with rear limb paralysis or profound weakness often learn quickly how to use a wheelchair that they pull behind them. Other types of assistive devices can help with everyday mobility as well.
What if my pet has a hidden disability?

Some disabilities are not immediately obvious to the outside observer but still require lifestyle adaptations. It is important to think through what these pets need in the way of day-to-day support and then help them live their very best life within their limitations.

"It is important to think through what these pets need in the way of day-to-day support and then help them live their very best life within their limitations." 

Blindness can be acquired or present from birth. Blind dogs should not have unsupervised access to stairs, for instance, although blind cats can generally negotiate them safely. Blind animals can be trained to localize and follow sounds such as clicks and whistles. In a household with more than one pet, a blind pet will often rely on another animal in the household to lead the way.

Deafness is quite similar to blindness in many respects. It can be acquired or present from birth. Deaf pets must be protected from traffic and other unpleasant surprises but can otherwise live a fairly normal lifestyle and have a normal life expectancy. See the handouts “Living with a Deaf Dog” and “Living with a Deaf Cat” for specific advice on helping an animal with hearing loss.

Other invisible disabilities include issues affecting mentation, such as cognitive dysfunction and anxiety disorders. These are no less real than the loss of a limb, and they require their own specific management strategies.

If your pet has one of these hidden disabilities, your veterinarian can help you create the best plan to help your pet cope.

What is my takeaway message?
"Your veterinarian is your best source for accurate information, guidance, and support when making and executing a plan for the care of a disabled, special-needs pet."

No matter the issue that makes a pet different, difference alone need not mean the end of a life. Your veterinarian is your best source for accurate information, guidance, and support when making and executing a plan for the care of a disabled, special-needs pet. Enthusiasm coupled with pragmatism can carry the day for these special animal companions.

Related Tags

pets, disabilities, disability, veterinary, pain, dogs, normal, overview, activities, limb, mobility, issues, cats, blind, longer, guidance, birth, lifestyle, hidden, daily, day-to-day, alter, elimination, deaf, loss, paralysis, strategies, household, acquired, blindness, limitations, executing, accurate, source, altered, management, focus, whatever, relieving, carry, injury, issue, instance, facing, priority, comfortable, deafness, geriatric, senior, bond, older, contact, medium-breed, family-pet, feed, relationship, infectious

Looking to learn more?

We also offer free, instant access to over 1,500 related articles on your pet's health including preventive medicine, common and not so common diseases, and even informative case studies. We encourage you to read any of these popular articles below or search our extensive pet health library.

Most Popular Articles

About our approach to exceptional pet health care

At VCA Animal Hospitals, our veterinarians take you and your pet's health seriously. With over 600 hospitals and 1,800 fully qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians, we strive to give your pet the very best in medical care. We understand your pet is an extension of you, and appreciate the opportunity to share in providing exceptional pet care and quality of life.

* Free initial health exam for new clients only. Not to be combined with any other offer. Not good toward boarding, grooming, prescription and non-prescription medication, and retail items. Not good toward emergency and/or specialty veterinary services. Coupon good for up to two pets (dogs or cats only) per household. Redeemable only at a general practice VCA Animal Hospital. For pet owners who are aged 18 and older.

If you are a new client, you can get a free first exam* on your first visit.

Free First Exam

Get to know us by visiting one of our neighborhood hospitals.

Locate a Hospital
CLOSE CLOSE

General Practice

We have over 540 animal hospitals in 41 states that are staffed by more than 2,000 fully qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians, with more than 200 being board-certified specialists. The nationwide VCA family of general practice hospitals give your pet the very best in medical care, providing a full range of general medical and surgical services as well as specialized treatments*: Wellness, Spay/neuter, Advanced diagnostic services (MRI/CT Scan), Internal medicine, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology, Cardiology, Neurology, Boarding, Grooming

*services may vary by location.

Our family of pet hospitals stands out by delivering the greatest resources in order provide the highest quality care available for your pets. By maintaining the highest standards of pet health care available anywhere, we emphasize prevention as well as healing. We provide continuing education programs to our doctors and staff and promote the open exchange of professional knowledge and expertise. And finally, we have established a consistent program of procedures and techniques, proven to be the most effective in keeping pets healthy.

Find a VCA General Care Animal Hospital near you:

 

See all VCA Animal Hospitals >

CLOSE CLOSE

Specialty Care

Sometimes sick or injured pets need the care of a veterinary medical specialist. When that happens, VCA specialty hospitals work closely with the general practitioner veterinarians who refer cases to us in order to provide seamless veterinary care to your pet. When your pet is facing any kind of serious illness or injury, our specialty referral hospitals will provide the compassionate and expert care your beloved pet needs.

Our goal is to make sure that when you and your pet are in need that you have access to board certified specialists who are up to date on the very latest developments in their field. In our state of the art hospitals, our specialists also have access to the most sophisticated diagnostic and treatment tools and techniques from ultrasonography and endoscopy to CAT scans and even MRI.

We have twenty-eight specialty hospitals across the US so there may be one near you. Our specialized services include: cardiology, critical care, dentistry, dermatology, internal medicine, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology, radiology and surgery.

Find a VCA Specialty Care Animal Hospital near you:

 

See all VCA Animal Hospitals >

CLOSE CLOSE

Emergency Care

In case of emergency, please call us immediately. If it is after hours, check with a local animal hospital emergency clinic.

CLOSE CLOSE