VCA Animal Hospitals

Osteoarthritis in Dogs - Joint Support and Disease - Modifying Osteoarthritis Drugs (DMOADs)

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. It is one of the most common chronic diseases of dogs. By some estimates, 20% of dogs of all ages are affected by OA.

What causes osteoarthritis?

The contributing causes of OA are many and varied. A dog’s conformation (how the body is put together) can setosteoarthritis-in-dogs the stage for movement that puts extra stress and strain on the joints. Some genetic abnormalities, such as canine hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia, can prevent joints from developing normally. Joints affected by dysplasia tend to develop OA fairly early in life. OA can also result from a traumatic injury to a joint (for instance, in a dog that is hit by a car).

Overweight and obesity are important contributing factors in canine OA. The joints of an overweight or obese dog are subjected to repetitive pounding that over time contributes to the initiation and progression of OA and the degenerative, painful processes associated with it.

What can I do to help my dog with OA?

Your veterinarian is the best source for a comprehensive OA management plan.

Your veterinarian is the best source for a comprehensive OA management plan. Certainly, if a dog is overweight or obese, that is where we must start, but there is much more that can be done to help support the joints of a dog suffering from OA. In addition to diet modifications, exercise, weight loss, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a multimodal OA management strategy may include a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD).

What is a DMOAD?

A DMOAD is a medication that can slow or alter the progression of OA. One of the DMOADs commonly used in dogs with OA is an injectable medication containing the active ingredient polysulfated glycosaminoglygan (PSGAG).

A DMOAD is a medication that can slow or alter the progression of OA.

PSGAG has several effects that help manage OA. Once injected, the PSGAG is distributed into joint fluid and cartilage. Although the exact mechanism of action is not completely understood, PSGAG inhibits enzymes that contribute to cartilage degradation, thus slowing cartilage breakdown in OA joints. By blocking cartilage degradation, PSGAG helps decrease inflammation—an important source of pain in an OA patient. PSGAG also contributes to cartilage healing by providing the body with the building blocks of cartilage. Finally, this medication improves the consistency of joint fluid, providing better joint lubrication, improving joint mobility, and increasing comfort in dogs with OA.

How are injections of PSGAG given?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for PSGAG specified a total of 12 injections given into a muscle over an 8-week period in dogs with OA. Studies have shown that injecting under the skin results in the same distribution of PSGAG to the joints as injections into a muscle. These subcutaneous or “subQ” injections are much less painful for dogs and much easier to give. Most veterinarians teach their clients to give PSGAG injections under the skin at home (just like giving insulin, but much less frequent).

Will my dog’s OA be cured after giving the initial 12 injections of PSGAG?

Although the FDA label specifies an 8-week treatment period, unfortunately OA is never cured; it is only managed. For this reason, most veterinarians recognize the need for ongoing joint support in dogs with OA. Clinical experience of many years supports the decision to use PSGAG injections on an ongoing “maintenance” schedule—typically every 2 weeks or twice per month (whichever is easier to remember).

Most veterinarians recognize the need for ongoing joint support in dogs with OA.

Any time a veterinarian chooses, within the context of a doctor-client-patient relationship, to use a medication differently than the label specifies, this is called “extra-label” use. Extra-label use of medications is quite common in veterinary medicine, but you should ask your veterinarian any and all questions you have so you feel comfortable about PSGAG therapy.

Are there any side effects of PSGAG that I should worry about?

Mild transient diarrhea has been reported using PSGAG at the recommended dose. PSGAG is not recommended for use in dogs with bleeding disorders.

How long after starting PSGAG will I notice an improvement in my dog?

Because PSGAGs are but one part of a comprehensive approach to OA, most dogs will improve quickly. That said, the effects of PSGAG appear to be cumulative, so optimal results can be expected by the eighth week, when the frequency of injections drops to twice monthly.

How long will my dog need PSGAG injections?

OA is a progressive lifetime disease. Fortunately, PSGAG is generally considered beneficial over the long term. Because the risk of adverse side effects is quite low, long-term use of PSGAG is generally well-tolerated.

Long-term use of PSGAG is generally well-tolerated.

In some cases, a dog’s OA management can be fine-tuned in such a way that ongoing PSGAG dosing allows for a decreased dose or even withdrawal of pain medications (e.g., NSAIDs) that have a higher risk of side effects.

Related Tags

dogs, osteoarthritis, joint, joints, injections, disease, cartilage, drugs, medication, dmoads, dmoad, degenerative,

Looking to learn more?

We also offer free, instant access to over 1,500 related articles on your pet's health including preventive medicine, common and not so common diseases, and even informative case studies. We encourage you to read any of these popular articles below or search our extensive pet health library.

Most Popular Articles

About our approach to exceptional pet health care

At VCA Animal Hospitals, our veterinarians take you and your pet's health seriously. With over 600 hospitals and 1,800 fully qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians, we strive to give your pet the very best in medical care. We understand your pet is an extension of you, and appreciate the opportunity to share in providing exceptional pet care and quality of life.

* Free initial health exam for new clients only. Not to be combined with any other offer. Not good toward boarding, grooming, prescription and non-prescription medication, and retail items. Not good toward emergency and/or specialty veterinary services. Coupon good for up to two pets (dogs or cats only) per household. Redeemable only at a general practice VCA Animal Hospital. For pet owners who are aged 18 and older.

If you are a new client, you can get a free first exam* on your first visit.

Free First Exam

Get to know us by visiting one of our neighborhood hospitals.

Locate a Hospital
CLOSE CLOSE

General Practice

We have over 540 animal hospitals in 41 states that are staffed by more than 2,000 fully qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians, with more than 200 being board-certified specialists. The nationwide VCA family of general practice hospitals give your pet the very best in medical care, providing a full range of general medical and surgical services as well as specialized treatments*: Wellness, Spay/neuter, Advanced diagnostic services (MRI/CT Scan), Internal medicine, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology, Cardiology, Neurology, Boarding, Grooming

*services may vary by location.

Our family of pet hospitals stands out by delivering the greatest resources in order provide the highest quality care available for your pets. By maintaining the highest standards of pet health care available anywhere, we emphasize prevention as well as healing. We provide continuing education programs to our doctors and staff and promote the open exchange of professional knowledge and expertise. And finally, we have established a consistent program of procedures and techniques, proven to be the most effective in keeping pets healthy.

Find a VCA General Care Animal Hospital near you:

 

See all VCA Animal Hospitals >

CLOSE CLOSE

Specialty Care

Sometimes sick or injured pets need the care of a veterinary medical specialist. When that happens, VCA specialty hospitals work closely with the general practitioner veterinarians who refer cases to us in order to provide seamless veterinary care to your pet. When your pet is facing any kind of serious illness or injury, our specialty referral hospitals will provide the compassionate and expert care your beloved pet needs.

Our goal is to make sure that when you and your pet are in need that you have access to board certified specialists who are up to date on the very latest developments in their field. In our state of the art hospitals, our specialists also have access to the most sophisticated diagnostic and treatment tools and techniques from ultrasonography and endoscopy to CAT scans and even MRI.

We have twenty-eight specialty hospitals across the US so there may be one near you. Our specialized services include: cardiology, critical care, dentistry, dermatology, internal medicine, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology, radiology and surgery.

Find a VCA Specialty Care Animal Hospital near you:

 

See all VCA Animal Hospitals >

CLOSE CLOSE

Emergency Care

In case of emergency, please call us immediately. If it is after hours, check with a local animal hospital emergency clinic.

CLOSE CLOSE